The last Friday in September has been designated European Researchers’ Night by the European Commission. Throughout Europe activities are organised to show how exciting research can be and that researchers are ordinary people with extraordinary jobs. The target group is the general public, especially young people. Activities include experiments, interactive activities, exhibitions, dialogue with researchers, science cafés, science shows, workshops and competitions.

European Researchers’ Night in the citycenter of Uppsala 2011. Photo: VA, Klas-Herman Lundgren.

Background

European Researchers’ Night was organised for the first time in 2005 around Europe and in a number of locations in Sweden: Science Extravaganza in Stockholm.

In 2006, it was organised under the name ForskarFredag (ResearcherFriday) and was coordinated by VA. Since then, Researchers’ Night has been arranged annually and coordinated by VA in partnership with the Swedish Research Council and Vinnova.

Local events are arranged by universities or science centres. Researchers’ Night has grown from 9 cities in 2006 to 30 cities in 2019.

As part of European Researchers’ Night, VA organises the Researchers’ Grand Prix and runs mass experiments with schools across Sweden.

For more information about European Researchers’ Night in Sweden visit the ForskarFredag / European Researchers’ Night website

You can read more about European Researchers’ Night in the articles below:


| Helen Garrison

Wanted: Swedish pupils to participate in pioneering research

They can be found outside the supermarket, at the bus stop, at the swimming pool: public notice boards, covered in handwritten notes, messages and posters. But what is the function of the physical notice board in the digital age? Who is saying what? And why? Scientists are now seeking the help of school pupils to map the contents of public notice boards around Sweden.

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| Helen Garrison

Swedish pupils’ buried tea bags help to advance climate research

Last year, Swedish school pupils helped scientists to bury over three thousand tea bags in the countryside. The Tea Bag Experiment is a mass experiment to investigate soil decomposition rates in different parts of the country and how the process is being affected by climate change. The results have now been published and show that the first phase of decomposition is particularly affected by a warmer climate.

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| Vetenskap & Allmänhet

European science festival celebrates 10th anniversary in 27 towns across Sweden

Press release 150831

On 25 September it’s time for the European science festival Researchers’ Night that is taking place in 300 cities throughout Europe. In Sweden 27 towns are inviting schoolchildren and the general public to meet scientists in a range of activities, including workshops, science shows, science cafés and behind-the-scenes tours of research labs. The aim of Researchers’ Night is to show that scientists are ordinary people with extraordinary jobs.

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| Vetenskap & Allmänhet

Researchers’ Night experiment 2014 – Vegetable Experiment results English summary

Swedish children and teenagers are pretty diligent at eating fruit and vegetables, according to the results of a mass experiment organised as part of Researchers’ Night 2014. In the Vegetable Experiment, scientists at the Swedish National Food Agency enlisted the help of over 5,500 pupils, who acted as research assistants for a day. Carrots and apples top the list of most eaten fruit and vegetables.

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| Vetenskap & Allmänhet

Carrots and apples on top as Swedish pupils help scientists map their eating habits

Press release 150529

Swedish children and teenagers are pretty diligent at eating fruit and vegetables, according to the results of a mass experiment organised as part of Researchers’ Night. In the Vegetable Experiment, scientists at the Swedish National Food Agency enlisted the help of over 5500 pupils, who acted as research assistants for a day. Carrots and apples top the list of most eaten vegetables and fruit.

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| Vetenskap & Allmänhet

Swedish children to help climate scientists by burying tea bags

Press release 9 February 2015.

Is it possible to read the future in tea leaves? This is what scientists at Umeå University are hoping to find out and they are now looking for school classes across Sweden to participate in a mass experiment that will help to inform climate change research. The so-called ‘Tea Bag Experiment’ is part of the European science festival, Researchers’ Night.

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| Vetenskap & Allmänhet

Swedish researchers seek pupils to help map eating habits

Press Release 13 May 2014

How much fruit and vegetables do children and teenagers consume in Sweden? The Swedish National Food Agency is looking for investigative pupils who want to be research assistants for a day. This mass experiment is part of the science festival, Researchers’ Night.

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| Vetenskap & Allmänhet

10,000 pupils assist Swedish scientists with climate research

Press release 11 April 2014

Spring is now here and it arrives earlier each year.  A warmer climate means an earlier spring and a later autumn. But how is the delayed onset of autumn affecting the Swedish ecosystem? A mass experiment involving over 10,000 pupils across Sweden is helping scientists to study the effect of climate change on deciduous trees in autumn.

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